A place to log ideas and thoughts

George Veletsianos, PhD

Category: futures

In education, what can be made more flexible?

Even though flexibility and flexible learning most usually focus on enabling learners some degree of control and freedom over the location, time, and pace of their online studies (hence the terms “anytime anyplace” learning), flexibility may be applied to a wide range of pedagogical and institutional practices. Here’s some examples:

  • Flexible assessments (e.g., providing learners with “a menu” of assessment options to select from. Dr. Joan Hughes for instance allows students to complete a proportion of pre-determined set of badges in her course. This could also apply to assignment deliverables, wherein some students, for example, may produce essays while others may create videos)
  • Flexible admissions (e.g., providing multiple admission paths. For instance, at Royal Roads University students who do not hold an undergraduate degree may apply for admission under a flexible path that asks them to demonstrate how prior coursework and experience has prepared them for graduate study)
  • Flexible “attendance” (e.g., providing learners to attend class based on their emerging needs. Dr. Valerie Irvine for instance calls this multi-access learning; a situation where a face-to-face classroom is set up in a way that allows learners to choose whether they can attend in f2f or online mode, and to make that decision as needs arise/change).
  • Flexible pacing, not only with respect to activities pertaining to a course, but also with respect to program pacing (e.g., start-end dates).
  • Flexible exit pathways. While flexible admissions refers to an entry pathway, exit pathways refer to how learners choose to finalize their program (e.g., thesis vs. coursework vs. work-integrated learning project options).
  • Flexible coursework options. This is the option where students have some control about the courses they enroll in. Imagining this on a continuum, on the one end students have no option of electives and at the other end students create their own unique interdisciplinary degrees. Typically, students have electives that they select, though that option could be made more flexible through, for example, allowing learners to choose electives from institutions/organizations other than their own.
  • Flexible course duration and flexible course credits. At the typical institution, courses last for X weeks and are worth Y credits (e.g., semester-long and 3-credits, or some variation of the 3-credit system including 1-credit, 6-credits and so on). Flexibility could be applied to this form of structure as well, with course duration and credit dependent on learning needs vis-a-vis a predetermined calendar/schedule. One could imagine for example a 2-credit course, or a 1.5-credit course within a university that typically offers 3-credit courses.

While there’s benefits to flexibility, such as empowering learners through greater agency, I am not arguing for flexibility to embedded in all of these forms. There’s philosophical questions to explore. And practical concerns that need to be overcome: Student information systems for example, might prevent the creation of fractional-credit courses, as I’m certain many of of you know.

What are some other ways that institutions, courses, learning design practices, and education more broadly can be made more flexible?


Royal Roads joins MITx MicroMasters pathway

I’ve been doing some work on higher education futures, which is where this post fits in. One would be remiss to explore what the future may or may not hold for higher education without first exploring their local contexts — a point that the Unbundled University project drives home through investigating unbundling in the UK and South African context.

The alarmist narratives around the disruption and transformation of higher education relied on the idea of imminent change. And even though sometimes things do change rapidly (e.g., see recent small university/college closures in the US, rise of public not-for profit online offerings/enrollments), more often than not, such change is gradual.

Royal Roads University has joined the Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s MITx Micromasters pathway. Under the pathway agreement, graduates will be able to apply 9 credits of their credentials in Supply Chain Management, Principles of Manufacturing or Data, Economics, and Development Policy towards completion of Royal Roads’ Master of Business Administration in Executive Management. “I’m very pleased to see Royal Roads University become the first Canadian university to offer pathways for students from MITx MicroMasters programs to master’s degrees,” said Krishna Rajagopal, MIT’s Dean for Digital Learning.

News Release

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