Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology & Associate Professor at Royal Roads University

Video: A review of the effectiveness and perceptions of OER as compared to textbooks

Posted on December 5th, by George Veletsianos in sharing. 2 comments

In a prior post, I explained how we’ve been creating video and audio summaries of our research. A number of colleagues have told me that they liked these, so I thought that it would be interesting and worthwhile to do one of these for someone else’s important research. So, we summarized the following paper: Hilton, J. (2016) Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64(4), 573 – 590.

Students spend a lot of money on textbooks. Alternatives to the expensive textbooks that come from commercial publishers are open educational resources, or OER. But, are these free resources as effective or of the same quality as textbooks? The research says yes. The animation summarizes the available research synthesized by Dr. John Hilton III in the aforementioned paper.

 

The rest of our animations are on our YouTube channel, ResearchShorts, and appear below:

The Life Between Big Data Log Events: Learners’ Strategies to Overcome Challenges in MOOCs

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/z0nIB_pcmEE

Veletsianos, G., Reich, J., & Pasquini, L. A. (2016). The life between big data log events: Learners’ strategies to overcome challenges in MOOCs. AERA Open, 2(3); 1–10. doi: 10.1177/2332858416657002

Digital Learning Environments

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/-7UI-dTbMr0

Veletsianos, G. (2016). Digital Learning Environments. In Rushby, N. & Surry D. (Eds) Handbook of Learning Technologies (pp. 242-260). Wiley.

A Systematic Analysis And Synthesis of the Empirical MOOC Literature Published in 2013-2015

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/M6_tuL-FYrY

Veletsianos, G. & Shepherdson, P. (2016). A systematic analysis and synthesis of the empirical MOOC literature published in 2013-2015. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(2).

The Structure & Characteristics of #PhDchat, an emergent Online Social Network.

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/64uSxFeeV5s

Ford, K., Veletsianos, G., & Resta, P. (2014). The structure and characteristics of #phdchat, an emergent online social networkJournal of Interactive Media in Education, 18(1).

Scholarship on Social Media and the Academic Self

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/O-Wn9ryJM6w
Veletsianos, G. (2013). Open Practices and Identity: Evidence from Researchers and Educators’ Social Media Participation. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(3), 639-651.

Scholars’ Open and Sharing Practices

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/v7VvpgZicXg

Veletsianos, G. (2015). A case study of scholars’ open and sharing practices. Open Praxis, 7(3), 199-209.

Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/Tuq28uL7rnU

Veletsianos, G. (2016). Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning: Foundations and Applications. Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press.

Digging Deeper Into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/EQ6ONvevAME

Veletsianos, G., Collier, A., & Schneider, E. (2015). Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs: Participation in social networks outside of MOOCs, Notetaking, and contexts surrounding content consumption. British Journal of Educational Technology 46(3), 570-587.

Who Studies MOOCs?

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/M2xhyxgHgo4

Veletsianos, G., & Shepherdson, P. (2015). Who studies MOOCs? Interdisciplinarity in MOOC research and its changes over time. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(3).

Using Twitter as a Conference Backchannel

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/EsCvFcs8vc8

Kimmons, R. & Veletsianos, G. (2016). Education Scholars’ Evolving Uses of Twitter as a Conference Backchannel and Social Commentary Platform. British Journal of Educational Technology, 47(3), 445—464.

How Do Professors and Students Use Twitter?

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/gUXI1ZgkKP0

Veletsianos, G., & Kimmons, R. (2016). Scholars in an Increasingly Digital and Open World: How do Education Professors and Students use Twitter? The Internet and Higher Education, 30, 1-10.

Why do professors, staff, and students disclose challenging personal and professional issues online?

YouTube URL:

Veletsianos, G., & Stewart, B. (2016). Discreet Openness: Scholars’ Selective and Intentional Self-Disclosures Online. Social Media+ Society, 2(3), 2056305116664222.

Predatory open access publishers and journals

Posted on November 14th, by George Veletsianos in papers. 1 Comment

Here’s what my email spam folder looks like some days:

a list of spam emails

Predatory open access publishing: “an exploitative open-access publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals.”

Jeffrey Beal gathers information on predatory open access publishers and journals. If you are ever unsure, double-check before submitting your paper. Better yet, start with a list of reputable open access journals in your field, such as the one below, which comes from page 33 in Perkins, R., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2016). Open access journals in educational technology: results of a survey of experienced users. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 32(3), 1-37.

 Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

 Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology

 Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

 Educational Technology & Society

 EDUCAUSE Review

 eLearning Papers

 Electronic Journal of e-Learning

 European Journal of Open and Distance Learning

 First Monday

 IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies*

 International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education*

 International Journal of Designs for Learning

 International Journal of Educational Research and Technology

 International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

 Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks

 Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

 Journal of Distance Education

 Journal of Information Technology Education

 Journal of Online Learning and Teaching

 Journal of Technology Education

 Kairos

 Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration

 Research in Learning Technology (ALT-J)

 Turkish Journal of Educational Technology

 Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education

Digital Learning Environments, Networks, Communities. Your thoughts on a new course?

Posted on October 17th, by George Veletsianos in courses, Ideas, online learning, open. 3 comments

At the School of Education and Technology at Royal Roads University, we are very excited to be redesigning our MA in Learning and Technology. We will share more about the program in the near future, but for now we’d love any input that you may have on one of the courses my colleague Elizabeth Childs and I are designing. The course is called Digital Learning, Environments, Networks, and Communities. The link sends you to a Google Doc that hosts a very rough first draft of the course. We would love to hear your thoughts, critiques, ideas, gaps, etc on the Google Doc. Are we missing important details/readings? Are there additional activities that we should consider? What questions do you have? How can this course be better?

Some background information on the program follows.

Context: This is the first course in a two year MA degree in Learning and Technology (33 credits). The degree is offered in two modes: fully online and blended. The online group of students and the blended group of students come together in the third course. Thereafter, they continue together and complete the rest of the degree fully online.

Program Goal:

The program is founded upon principles of networked learning, open pedagogy, personalization, relevance, and digital mindsets. Students collaborate and contribute meaningfully to digital learning networks and communities in the field. Graduates will be able to create and evaluate digital learning environments. Students will apply theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society.

Program Description:

The program responds to the demand for qualified professionals in the field of technology-mediated learning and education. It addresses the need for individuals who have the knowledge, skills and ability to assume the leadership roles that are required to plan, design, develop, implement and evaluate contemporary learning initiatives. Following several foundational courses, students transition into the inquiry-focused portion of the program. Next, they create digital learning resources based on personalized learning plans and facilitate a student-designed and student-led seminar experience that requires them to draw upon the networks and community(ies) they have been contributing to and cultivating over the duration of the program.  

Educational Technology. #EdTech. A discipline?

Posted on October 16th, by George Veletsianos in Ideas, open, scholarship, sharing. No Comments

I’ve been (re) reading the numerous posts on whether educational technology is a discipline, and on whether it’s needed. In light of that, I thought I’d post a link to this book: Educational Technology: A definition with commentary.

The first paragraph from the introduction reads:

“Continuing the tradition of the 1963, 1977, and 1994 AECT projects to define the ever-changing contours of the field, the Definition and Terminology Committee completed the most recent definitional effort with the publication of Educational Technology: A Definition with Commentary in 2007. The main purpose of the 384-page book is to frame the issues confronting educational technology in the context of today’s world of education and training. What is new, and frankly, controversial, about this latest definition is its insistence that “values” are integral to the very meaning of educational technology.”

I wonder what this conversation around discipline would look like if we published our work in more open ways, described the field in more consistent ways, were more inclusive, and engaged in more advocacy.