Professor & Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology at Royal Roads University

Tag: oer

BCcampus Open Education Advocacy & Research Fellowships

Posted on January 31st, by George Veletsianos in my research, open. No Comments

It’s February, already?! This year, I’m excited to spend some time collaborating with a group of open education colleagues, as part of a BCcampus Open Education Advocacy and Research Fellowship. The rest of the team consists of Jennifer Barker, Ken Jeffery, and Rajiv Jhangiani. Good company!

bccampusFellows

Group selfie, by Rajiv Jhangiani (CC-BY)

The aims of the fellowship are to raise awareness of open educational practices and to conduct, present, and publish research on open educational practices at BC institutions. You can read more about what each of us is hoping to achieve in this announcement.

And since this fellowship is related to advocacy, please take 4 minutes and 40 seconds to watch the video below which summarizes the empirical evidence on efficacy and perceptions surrounding open textbooks.

Video: A review of the effectiveness and perceptions of OER as compared to textbooks

Posted on December 5th, by George Veletsianos in sharing. 3 comments

In a prior post, I explained how we’ve been creating video and audio summaries of our research. A number of colleagues have told me that they liked these, so I thought that it would be interesting and worthwhile to do one of these for someone else’s important research. So, we summarized the following paper: Hilton, J. (2016) Open educational resources and college textbook choices: a review of research on efficacy and perceptions. Educational Technology Research and Development, 64(4), 573 – 590.

Students spend a lot of money on textbooks. Alternatives to the expensive textbooks that come from commercial publishers are open educational resources, or OER. But, are these free resources as effective or of the same quality as textbooks? The research says yes. The animation summarizes the available research synthesized by Dr. John Hilton III in the aforementioned paper.

 

The rest of our animations are on our YouTube channel, ResearchShorts, and appear below:

The Life Between Big Data Log Events: Learners’ Strategies to Overcome Challenges in MOOCs

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/z0nIB_pcmEE

Veletsianos, G., Reich, J., & Pasquini, L. A. (2016). The life between big data log events: Learners’ strategies to overcome challenges in MOOCs. AERA Open, 2(3); 1–10. doi: 10.1177/2332858416657002

Digital Learning Environments

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/-7UI-dTbMr0

Veletsianos, G. (2016). Digital Learning Environments. In Rushby, N. & Surry D. (Eds) Handbook of Learning Technologies (pp. 242-260). Wiley.

A Systematic Analysis And Synthesis of the Empirical MOOC Literature Published in 2013-2015

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/M6_tuL-FYrY

Veletsianos, G. & Shepherdson, P. (2016). A systematic analysis and synthesis of the empirical MOOC literature published in 2013-2015. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 17(2).

The Structure & Characteristics of #PhDchat, an emergent Online Social Network.

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/64uSxFeeV5s

Ford, K., Veletsianos, G., & Resta, P. (2014). The structure and characteristics of #phdchat, an emergent online social networkJournal of Interactive Media in Education, 18(1).

Scholarship on Social Media and the Academic Self

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/O-Wn9ryJM6w
Veletsianos, G. (2013). Open Practices and Identity: Evidence from Researchers and Educators’ Social Media Participation. British Journal of Educational Technology, 44(3), 639-651.

Scholars’ Open and Sharing Practices

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/v7VvpgZicXg

Veletsianos, G. (2015). A case study of scholars’ open and sharing practices. Open Praxis, 7(3), 199-209.

Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/Tuq28uL7rnU

Veletsianos, G. (2016). Emergence and Innovation in Digital Learning: Foundations and Applications. Edmonton, AB: Athabasca University Press.

Digging Deeper Into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/EQ6ONvevAME

Veletsianos, G., Collier, A., & Schneider, E. (2015). Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs: Participation in social networks outside of MOOCs, Notetaking, and contexts surrounding content consumption. British Journal of Educational Technology 46(3), 570-587.

Who Studies MOOCs?

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/M2xhyxgHgo4

Veletsianos, G., & Shepherdson, P. (2015). Who studies MOOCs? Interdisciplinarity in MOOC research and its changes over time. The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning, 16(3).

Using Twitter as a Conference Backchannel

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/EsCvFcs8vc8

Kimmons, R. & Veletsianos, G. (2016). Education Scholars’ Evolving Uses of Twitter as a Conference Backchannel and Social Commentary Platform. British Journal of Educational Technology, 47(3), 445—464.

How Do Professors and Students Use Twitter?

YouTube URL: https://youtu.be/gUXI1ZgkKP0

Veletsianos, G., & Kimmons, R. (2016). Scholars in an Increasingly Digital and Open World: How do Education Professors and Students use Twitter? The Internet and Higher Education, 30, 1-10.

Why do professors, staff, and students disclose challenging personal and professional issues online?

YouTube URL:

Veletsianos, G., & Stewart, B. (2016). Discreet Openness: Scholars’ Selective and Intentional Self-Disclosures Online. Social Media+ Society, 2(3), 2056305116664222.

Designing MOOCs for powerful learning experiences

Posted on September 19th, by George Veletsianos in sharing. 6 comments

I have proposed a session for the SXSWedu conference. The sessions to be presented are partly decided by community votes and comments. If you feel that my proposal is interesting or worthwhile, would you consider voting for it? You will need to create an account and register to do so. Here’s my proposal in detail:

Designing MOOCs for powerful learning experiences

Description: The mass media have embraced MOOCs and celebrated the disruptive nature of online education and the death of higher education institutions. On the other hand, critics’ responses to MOOCs have ranged from fetishizing face-to-face education to questioning the potential of technology. Both of these positions miss the research surrounding online education and the potential role that MOOCs may play in society. In this presentation, I will discuss how some MOOCs can be more appropriately described as commodified education, rather than the type of open education initiatives suggested by their acronym. The goal of this critique is to help us envision MOOCs as a means for powerful learning experiences and personally relevant/meaningful transformation. This can be attained through the following:
– Design opportunities that allow engagement beyond course activities
– Design for lasting impression
– Design for intrigue, risk-taking, and challenge
– Design for engagement and reflection

Questions Answered:
How do we create MOOCs that are exciting, that pull learners into the experience and hold their attention?
How do we design MOOCs that foster powerful and meaningful learning experiences?
How do we use emerging technologies to create learning *experiences* rather than efficient products?

Tags
online education, mooc, research

Format: Solo Presentation

Category: OER and MOOCs

Level: Intermediate

Speakers: George Veletsianos,  The University of Texas at Austin