Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology & Associate Professor at Royal Roads University

Tag: cfp

Journal of academic freedom CFP

Posted on December 12th, by George Veletsianos in emerging technologies, scholarship. 6 comments

The burgeoning interest in education and educational technology is the result of a multitude of forces, pressures, and failures: demographic, political, social, technological, and economic just to mention a few. And the outcomes aren’t just technology-enhanced or better courses. Educational institutions, academic roles, academic life itself, the student experience, and so on are changing. A recent call for proposals from The American Association of University Professors’ Journal of Academic Freedom (due: January 31, 2014) calls for authors to explore the relationship between academic freedom and some of these issues:

Electronic communications and academic freedom

  • How has the growth of electronic communications facilitated and impinged on academic freedom?
  • What are the implications for academic freedom of the proliferation of open access publications?
  • Are commercial entities contributing to the commodification of knowledge through various electronic gatekeeping mechanisms?
  • How can institutions cope with hacking and other forms of electronic piracy while maintaining accessibility?
  • To what extent are social media such as Twitter and Facebook changing forms of scholarly communication and knowledge dissemination, and what is the upshot for issues of academic freedom?
  • How are the increasingly elastic and intangible walls of the electronic classroom challenging existing definitions of academic freedom, shared governance, and intellectual property?
  • In what ways can we promote faculty participation in the shared governance of various forms of electronic communications?
  • Are faculty e-mails considered the property of the institution? Can administrators read faculty e-mails without notice or permission?

The abridgement of academic freedom in instruction

  • The case of former Indiana governor Mitchell Daniels’ efforts to purge scholars’ writings from the classroom has drawn attention to renewed attacks on academic freedom in instruction. Where are such attacks coming from and how have they been resolved?
  • The Gates Foundation has devoted millions of dollars to supporting MOOCs and other experiments in online teaching. To what extent are such experiments curtailing or facilitating faculty input into course design?
  • The suspension of University of Virginia president Teresa Sullivan in 2012 drew attention to the increasingly tense relationship between university boards of trustees and university faculty and executives. In what ways, if any, are such institutional dynamics transforming academic freedom in instruction?
  • Federal and state assessment protocols are putting pressure on curricula in many fields. We are interested in both case studies and overviews that detail the impact of these pressures on academic freedom.

The increased use of suspensions

  • In September 2013, a professor at the University of Kansas tweeted a comment about gun control that led to a barrage of hate messages. The university suspended this faculty member in order to “avoid disruption.” To what extent are such misused suspensions proliferating, and how might faculty members be made more aware of their rights?
  • As university work has become more complex and extensive, the number of duties from which professors can be suspended has proliferated. Examples include relationships of researchers to outside funding agencies, access to email and computing services, and workplace provisions against sexual misconduct, just to name a few of the complex domains in which professors often operate today. What kinds of problems of academic freedom do partial suspensions in these and other areas represent?
  • University administrators often seek to cloak suspension in duplicitous language. Does reassignment to duties other than teaching constitute a form of suspension, for example?  What is the distinction between such a sanctioning of faculty rights and total suspension?

 

 

 

AECT 2013: Research & Theory Division Call for Proposals

Posted on January 22nd, by George Veletsianos in sharing. 5 comments

The 2013 AECT Conference proposal system is open. The members and leadership of the Research and Theory division are excited to invite you to submit a proposal to our division! The call for proposals is at http://www.aect.org/events/call/ and proposals close on February 15, 2013 (11:59pm EST).

The Research and Theory division promotes the development and advancement of theory; promotes, presents, and disseminates rigorous research and scholarship; advocates the study of social and cultural issues in the field; and supports, fosters, and mentors emerging scholars. Any studies that embody excellent research methods in any area of interest to AECT members could be appropriate for submission to R&T division. Topics such as the relationship between research and theory, innovative research methods, ethical considerations in research, challenges associated with conducting research with data from web-based sources, and the position of Educational Technology as a field in the context of related fields such as the Learning Sciences, Cognitive Science, Psychology, etc., might be of particular interest to R&T division members.

We continue to encourage authors to submit their work in the following categories:
•  Category 1: Completed Study
Report findings from a study that is complete.
•  Category 2: Work in Progress
Report the progress of a study currently underway (e.g., as a Reflection Paper Session).
•  Category 3: Research Methodology
Report innovative research methodologies in Educational Technology.

Authors can submit their work in any of the above categories that fit the interest of the R&T division and address this year’s conference theme “Innovate! Integrate! Communicate!” Proposals that use rigorous quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods are particularly warranted.

When submitting your proposal, please state in the abstract which category you are submitting your work. For example,
•  ”This proposal reports a Category 1 Completed Study on …”
•  ”This proposal reports a Category 2 Work in Progress on …” or
•  ”This proposal reports a Category 3 Research Methodology …”

Proposals that fit all the session types are welcome:
•  Concurrent Session
•  Roundtable Session
•  Reflection Paper Session
•  Panel Sessions

Questions regarding proposals for the R&T Division should be directed to Dr. George Veletsianos at veletsianos |at| gmail.com

We look forward to your submissions!

ICEM 2013 Conference CFP (October 1-4)

Posted on December 14th, by George Veletsianos in cfp. 3 comments

ICEM 2013 logo
Authors are invited  to submit abstracts and participate in the 63rd International Council for Educational Media (ICEM) Conference that will be held in Singapore from 1 – 4 October 2013.

The late 1990s saw the emergence of e-Learning.  Many schools and institutions have embarked on campus-wide initiatives that comprised content-driven and technology-enhanced pedagogy until the advent of Web 2.0. Now, however, the educational model is undergoing a complete change of approach and both the blended learning model and participative learning have become more possible and meaningful, especially when combined with the changing profile of Gen Y students.

The conference theme ‘we-Learning: Content, Community and Collaboration’ recognises these pervasive and rapid changes that are having a profound impact on education and society.  Education at all levels plays a central role in shaping the way these changes affect the economy, society and a new generation of knowledge workers.  Knowledge and content are now a touch away and the new classroom has no physical boundaries. People and resources are linked across borders allowing for new types of collaboration.  What does this mean for learning and teaching in tertiary education? This conference explores the paradigm shift from e-Learning to we-Learning, and the broad consequences for education in a changing world.

Conference Date and Location
Date: 1 – 4 October 2013
Location: Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

Topics of interest to this international event include, but are not limited to the following:
·         Social and Collaborative Learning
·         Participative Learning
·         Integrative Learning with Technology
·         Learning Design (Theory and Practice)
·         Games and gamification in education and training
·         Borderless mobile learning
·         Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs)
·         Social media and learning
·         Distance education and Web 2.0
·         Educational media
·         New media, new literacies
·         Research and evaluation methods in educational technology
·         Professional development, teacher education and lifelong learning
·         Social media and learning
·         Creative learning and teaching models
·         New learning spaces and technology
·         Changing conditions of higher education
We encourage the submission of a variety of papers and works including but not limited to position papers, empirical research, case studies, classroom implementations, case studies with applications of educational technology, theoretical discussions, and critical reviews of literature.

Abstract Submission Guidelines
The abstract should include a brief introduction, research questions, research design and methods, and (expected) results in no more than 500 words (approximately 1-2 pages, single spaced).

Submit your abstract here:              http://icem2013.elite.sg/

Abstracts submission deadline:          31 March 2013
Acceptance notification:                       30 June 2013
Final camera ready papers due by     15 August 2013

More information of the ICEM2013 conference is available at http://icem2013.ntu.edu.sg

BJET Special Issue CFP: Learning and Teaching in Virtual Worlds

Posted on August 18th, by George Veletsianos in cfp, E-learning, learner experience, work. No Comments

Click here to access a PDF document of this call

Crossing boundaries:

Learning and teaching in virtual worlds

While the concept of multi-user virtual worlds is not a new one, the rising popularity of virtual world applications has been rapid over the last five years. Although much attention around such immersive environments has centred upon Second Life, there are currently 80 virtual world applications available and another 100 planned for 2009, with some targeting specific populations (e.g., young girls with BarbieGirls) and others catering for broader audiences (e.g., training applications in There.com). The appeal of virtual worlds is that they allow users to cross over into new spaces that can be used to support a range of social interactions. In this way, they have proven to be quite versatile, embracing varied activities and purposes, including business, cultural activities as well as having educational capabilities.

With its focus upon the educational uses of virtual world applications, this special issue of the British Journal of Educational Technology (Volume 40, Issue 6) aims to provide a definitive profile of the current status of virtual worlds for education and training. Specifically, we invite contributions from the research community to advance our understanding of this field of study and research. In order to build upon existing research, and to support the development of the field as a unique academic discipline, in this unique issue the editors are interested in hosting a forum for rigorous and leading edge contributions to the nascent field that:

  • explore new frameworks, approaches and pedagogical models,
  • present case studies of practice where innovative techniques are pioneered,
  • investigate new methods of teaching, learning and research in the area,
  • evaluate the experiences of teachers, learners and institutions using immersive worlds.

The aim of the special issue is to bring together the most leading edge research and development in the field and allow practitioners and researchers to benefit from these valuable contributions. Towards this aim, recommended topics of interest for this special issue include, but are not limited to, the following research questions:

  • What value can virtual world applications add to conventional methods of education and what evidence exists to support such propositions?
  • What are the institutional changes needed to accommodate learning approaches centred on virtual worlds?
  • What pedagogies and approaches are needed to make the use of virtual world applications most effective and engaging, and what evidence exists to support such approaches?
  • Are particular learner groups engaged more with virtual world applications than others?
  • What are the main challenges for tutors and trainers using virtual world technologies?
  • What are the main technological challenges associated with using virtual world applications?
  • What frameworks and approaches can be developed to support effective, engaging and transformative usage of virtual worlds?
  • Does the use of virtual worlds necessitate more learner-centred approaches? What evidence exists to support claims for or against such approaches?
  • Will using these applications change how people learn? If so, what evidence exists to support such a claim?
  • Do virtual world applications offer greater support than alternative technologies for building and supporting distributed learning communities?
  • How do learners experience virtual worlds? How do they experience their interactions with others?
  • How do learners choose to represent themselves in virtual worlds?

The issue also envisages contributions that relate to a wider range of virtual world applications particularly where learning and training issues are highlighted. Studies focusing upon massively multiplayer role-playing games (e.g. World of Warcraft), mirror worlds (e.g. Google earth) and hybrid worlds (e.g. mixed reality experiences) will also be considered for the issue where they make sure that the focus is upon learning activities and practices and where lessons learnt may be applied to virtual worlds for learning.

The issue will also be twinned with the First International IEEE Conference on Serious Games and Virtual Worlds which will be held in March 2009 at the University of Coventry, UK.

Submission Process

April 1, 2009: Full length papers due (see http://www.blackwellpublishing.com/submit.asp?ref=0007-1013&site=1 for guidelines). Please send an email to the editors with the title of your submission and submit your paper online using Manuscript Central. To make a submission, go to http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/bjet. If this is the first time you have used the system you will be asked to register by clicking on ‘create an account.’ Full instructions on making your submission are provided.  You should receive an acknowledgement within a few minutes.  Thereafter, you will be kept in touch with the progress of your submission through refereeing, any revisions that are required, and – hopefully – to final acceptance.

Please advise Sara de Freitas that you have made a submission for the special issue.  If you do not then it will be treated as an ordinary submission for a subsequent general issue

June 1, 2009:  Notification of acceptance

July 1, 2009: Final papers with revisions due

November, 2009: Publication date

Note: Submissions to the Crossing boundaries Serious Games and Virtual Worlds conference to be held at Coventry University in March 2009 that fit the purpose of this call may be recommended for co-submission to the special issue. Authors will be contacted directly where this is the case so that they can revisit the paper for the BJET special issue review process. Successfully reviewed papers will be processed by BJET in the normal way and according to the normal peer-review procedures. For those wishing to submit papers to the conference, details can be found at: http://www.sgandvwconference.net/announcement.asp?event=42

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sara de Freitas B.A. (Hons), M.A., PhD

Sara de Freitas is Director of Research at the hub for research and development in serious games and virtual worlds at the Serious Games Institute at the University of Coventry, UK. Her research interests include evaluating the efficacy of serious games and virtual world applications, pedagogic modelling and policy and strategic development of e-learning. Sara chairs the Lab Group, speaks internationally and has a significant publications list in the field of e-learning, game-based learning and lifelong learning. Sara also holds a visiting fellowship at the University of London where she continues to build on leading edge research in the field at the London Knowledge Lab. She currently has four books in publication and is setting up an interdisciplinary research group focusing upon artificial intelligence, evaluation and validation for immersive forms and developing links between physical and virtual spaces through smart buildings. (Address: Sara de Freitas, PhD, Serious Games Institute, University of Coventry, Cheetah Road, Coventry, CV1 2TL, United Kingdom; s.defreitas|at|coventry.ac.uk).

Dr. George Veletsianos B.A., M.A., Ph.D

George Veletsianos is Lecturer of Digital Technologies, Communication & Education at the University of Manchester, UK. His research interests involve the design, development, and evaluation of electronic learning environments, adventure learning, emerging technologies in distance and hybrid education, virtual characters, and the learner experience. His research and development work has been published in excess of 30 times in articles and manuscripts in academic journals, books, and conference proceedings, while his work has been presented at over 40 national and international conferences. (Address:  George Veletsianos, PhD, LTA, School of Education, Ellen Wilkinson Building, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, United Kingdom; veletsianos|at|gmail.com)