Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology & Associate Professor at Royal Roads University

A helping hand?

Posted on February 17th, by George Veletsianos in sharing. 1 Comment

When my friends Jon Becker and Alec Couros were applying for tenure, they did something open, innovative, and thoughtful: They asked the community for  feedback on their work and scholarship. This feedback often gets missed in tenure applications because it the impact and reach of scholarship tends to be evaluated in basic ways: How many times was a publications cited? In how many high-impact factor journals did one publish in? Alec’s and Jon’s request serve to add another dimension to the evaluation of their work.

I find myself in a similar position. Would you please help me provide a more diverse evidence for my application? If my work has impacted you in any way, could you please add a note below? Perhaps my research was helpful in helping you get started on your MA/PhD thesis/dissertation. Or perhaps you used my work to provide professional development for teachers/faculty. Or, you assigned my work as reading. Or, you reused one of the teaching activities I shared on my blog. Or, you learned something from me at some time. Many of these “indicators of impact” are invisible, so, in essence what I am asking is to help me make them visible.

If you have a few moments to spare, I’d appreciate your feedback in the form below, which has the same format as the one created by Jon (Thanks, Jon!). My plan is to include these data with my application in raw and summary form.

Digging deeper into learners’ experiences in MOOCs – infographic

Posted on February 16th, by George Veletsianos in moocs, my research, online learning, open, scholarship. No Comments

The British Journal of Educational Technology and BERA approached us to create an infographic for the article we (Amy Collier, Emily Schneider, and myself) published last year: Digging Deeper into Learners’ Experiences in MOOCs: Participation in social networks outside of MOOCs, Notetaking, and contexts surrounding content consumption

Below is the outcome (and a pdf version is here):

Veletsianos_BJET_infographic

Open PhD-position in Cognitive Science at Lund University

Posted on February 3rd, by George Veletsianos in sharing. No Comments

Below is an available position in Cognitive Science at Lund University, with possibility of placement in the Educational Technology group. Lund University is a great institution, and so are the colleagues at the Educational Technology research group.

Announcement follows.
*****   FULLY FUNDED PHD POSITION AT LUND UNIVERSITY COGNITIVE SCIENCE   *****

I would like to bring to your attention an open PhD-position in Cognitive Science at Lund University. Applications are welcome in all areas in Cognitive Science represented at the department including Educational Technology

**The Educational Technology Group**   www.lucs.lu.se/educational-technology/     consists of senior researchers, Ph D students and master students. The group develops educational technology systems and prototypes with two purposes: (1) exploiting them as research instruments to explore learning processes, and (2) coming up with pedagogical software with a real-world value as pedagogical tools.

The two purposes are intertwined. The developed software builds on empirical findings about the human mind within the cognitive and the learning sciences. The software is used to extend our knowledge, and the knowledge gained is fed back into the software as we develop it further. Our projects are characterized by an orientation towards school’s and preschool’s educational practices, together with the use of iterative processes of evaluation and redesigning.

The Educational Technology Group has close collaborations with some other national groups and with AAA-lab at Stanford University. Other essential collaborators are a number of schools and preschools, in Sweden and in the U.S., with their students, teachers and headmasters.

For more information about the group and the research domain contact
Professor Agneta Gulz  —  Agneta.Gulz@lucs.lu.se

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More information about Lund University Cognitive Science can be found at the homepage: http://www.lucs.lu.se

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Type of employment: Limit of tenure, Maximum 4 years
Extent: 100 %  If combined with up to 20% teaching, the length is extended accordingly.

A completed master education in a relevant field is required to be eligible for the position.

Apply online (from February 1st):

http://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/erek/category/D

Application must be received before March 1st, 2016.

The application must include:

– records of first- and second-cycle studies (Ladok transcript or other transcript of courses and grades)

– first- and second-cycle theses/degree projects

– a list of other relevant administrative and educational qualifications

– scholarly journal articles, reports or papers of relevance for the subject

– where applicable, documented skills in a language of relevance for the research studies

– project proposal (1500 words max. excluding references)

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For general information please contact:

Christian Balkenius, Professor
046-222 32 51
Christian.Balkenius@lucs.lu.se

Social Media in Academia: Now available

Posted on January 27th, by George Veletsianos in my research, networked scholars, NPS, sharing, work. 1 Comment

Martin Weller sent me a photo of my book a couple of weeks ago. I was away from the office, and that was the first time I saw a photo of the physical book. I saw the physical one a week later when I returned to my office. There it was. In print. And published.

networked_scholars

I wanted to write a book about the complicated realities of the use of technology in education. I wanted to write about us. About the people who use technology as part of their day-to-day professional life – and about the times that professional and personal life are intertwined. I am tired of the recycled unsubstantiated claims regarding the potential of new solutions and new technologies. So, I wrote a book about scholars and social media. A book about what scholars – professors and doctoral students – do on social media and why the use them. A book about those times that the potential is realized, those times that new technologies are put into familiar uses, and those times that the issues become a tad more complex. No surprises there – I’ve been working on this area for a few years now.

If you would like me to talk to your colleagues or students about this area, I would be happy to do so. I hope the short blurb below describes the essence of the argument:

Social media and online social networks are expected to transform academia and the scholarly process. However, intense emotions permeate scholars’ online practices and an increasing number of academics are finding themselves in trouble in networked spaces. In reality, the evidence describing scholars’ experiences in online social networks and social media is fragmented. As a result, the ways that social media are used and experienced by scholars are not well understood. Social Media in Academia examines the day-to-day realities of social media and online networks for scholarship and illuminates the opportunities, tensions, conflicts, and inequities that exist in these spaces. The book concludes with suggestions for institutions, individual scholars, and doctoral students regarding online participation, social media, networked practice, and public scholarship.