Professor & Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Technology at Royal Roads University

Predatory open access publishers and journals

Posted on November 14th, by George Veletsianos in papers. 2 comments

Here’s what my email spam folder looks like some days:

a list of spam emails

Predatory open access publishing: “an exploitative open-access publishing business model that involves charging publication fees to authors without providing the editorial and publishing services associated with legitimate journals.”

Jeffrey Beal gathers information on predatory open access publishers and journals. If you are ever unsure, double-check before submitting your paper. Better yet, start with a list of reputable open access journals in your field, such as the one below, which comes from page 33 in Perkins, R., & Lowenthal, P. R. (2016). Open access journals in educational technology: results of a survey of experienced users. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 32(3), 1-37.

 Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

 Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology

 Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education

 Educational Technology & Society

 EDUCAUSE Review

 eLearning Papers

 Electronic Journal of e-Learning

 European Journal of Open and Distance Learning

 First Monday

 IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies*

 International Journal of Artificial Intelligence in Education*

 International Journal of Designs for Learning

 International Journal of Educational Research and Technology

 International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning

 Journal of Asynchronous Learning Networks

 Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication

 Journal of Distance Education

 Journal of Information Technology Education

 Journal of Online Learning and Teaching

 Journal of Technology Education

 Kairos

 Online Journal of Distance Learning Administration

 Research in Learning Technology (ALT-J)

 Turkish Journal of Educational Technology

 Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education

Digital Learning Environments, Networks, Communities. Your thoughts on a new course?

Posted on October 17th, by George Veletsianos in courses, Ideas, online learning, open. 3 comments

At the School of Education and Technology at Royal Roads University, we are very excited to be redesigning our MA in Learning and Technology. We will share more about the program in the near future, but for now we’d love any input that you may have on one of the courses my colleague Elizabeth Childs and I are designing. The course is called Digital Learning, Environments, Networks, and Communities. The link sends you to a Google Doc that hosts a very rough first draft of the course. We would love to hear your thoughts, critiques, ideas, gaps, etc on the Google Doc. Are we missing important details/readings? Are there additional activities that we should consider? What questions do you have? How can this course be better?

Some background information on the program follows.

Context: This is the first course in a two year MA degree in Learning and Technology (33 credits). The degree is offered in two modes: fully online and blended. The online group of students and the blended group of students come together in the third course. Thereafter, they continue together and complete the rest of the degree fully online.

Program Goal:

The program is founded upon principles of networked learning, open pedagogy, personalization, relevance, and digital mindsets. Students collaborate and contribute meaningfully to digital learning networks and communities in the field. Graduates will be able to create and evaluate digital learning environments. Students will apply theoretical and practical knowledge to critically analyze learning innovations and assess their impact on organizations and society.

Program Description:

The program responds to the demand for qualified professionals in the field of technology-mediated learning and education. It addresses the need for individuals who have the knowledge, skills and ability to assume the leadership roles that are required to plan, design, develop, implement and evaluate contemporary learning initiatives. Following several foundational courses, students transition into the inquiry-focused portion of the program. Next, they create digital learning resources based on personalized learning plans and facilitate a student-designed and student-led seminar experience that requires them to draw upon the networks and community(ies) they have been contributing to and cultivating over the duration of the program.  

Educational Technology. #EdTech. A discipline?

Posted on October 16th, by George Veletsianos in Ideas, open, scholarship, sharing. No Comments

I’ve been (re) reading the numerous posts on whether educational technology is a discipline, and on whether it’s needed. In light of that, I thought I’d post a link to this book: Educational Technology: A definition with commentary.

The first paragraph from the introduction reads:

“Continuing the tradition of the 1963, 1977, and 1994 AECT projects to define the ever-changing contours of the field, the Definition and Terminology Committee completed the most recent definitional effort with the publication of Educational Technology: A Definition with Commentary in 2007. The main purpose of the 384-page book is to frame the issues confronting educational technology in the context of today’s world of education and training. What is new, and frankly, controversial, about this latest definition is its insistence that “values” are integral to the very meaning of educational technology.”

I wonder what this conversation around discipline would look like if we published our work in more open ways, described the field in more consistent ways, were more inclusive, and engaged in more advocacy.

The most solid advice for researchers studying the use of technology in education

Posted on September 8th, by George Veletsianos in scholarship, sharing. 2 comments

If you are engaged in any sort of inquiry into the use of technology in education (whether a student, research, instructor, etc), the following recommendation cannot be emphasized enough:

“Given the increasingly complex role that technology now plays in education and the growing need for clarity around what technology can and cannot do to improve learner success, it is critical that the research we do addresses real-world educational needs and is disseminated in a way that can meaningfully inform design practice. It is, therefore, becoming increasingly clear that the field’s major outlets for disseminating our scholarship should be organized around the problems we are trying to address (flagging learner engagement, poor teaching, rising costs of education, lack of accessibility) rather than the things we are using to solve those problems (learning analytics, online learning, gamification, 3D printing, and the like).”

In short: study problems, not things.

The quote comes from the call of proposals for AECT’s latest Handbook of Research in Educational Communications and Technology.